Visit Red River Paper!
Digital PhotoCorner

Digital Photo Corner
Home

About This Site
Site Help & Hints

DIGIPHOTO 101
SPONSORED BY
Red River Paper
Visit The Class
Click Here

CRUISE PHOTOS
2007, 2008, Other

Digital Photography Cruise

ALL ABOUT
Monitor Calibration
Resolution
Digital Photography
Digital Terms
Easy Digital Imaging

DIGITAL PROS
New American Pin-ups
Al Francekevich
Hiroshi Kamakura
Renata Ratajczyk

Digital Camera Magazine

INFO-SHARE
Ask & You'll Receive

Maya Powerex batteries

HOW TO DO IT
Print Like A Pro
Emailing Photos
Open Shade Portraits
Shoot A Picture Essay
Using Photo CD

DIGITAL TOOLS
Nifty New Goodies
You Just Gotta Have

Great New Books

TECH TOPICS
Using Old Lenses
Recognizing Digital Artifacts

Visit Dealtime!

FREE STUFF
Model Releases

CLASSIFIED ADS
Buy, Sell, Trade Here!

RESOURCES
Stock Photography
Great New Books!
Other DigiPhoto Sites

EXHIBIT HALLS
Digital Photography
DP101 Student Gallery

E-mail
How To Send Us
Email & Photos

THE ARCHIVES
It's Here...Somewhere

Our Privacy Policy


Kids Shine In Open Shade (Cont'd)

Until you begin to notice these subtle differences, have your subjects turn from time to time and take pictures of them from different directions. All the pictures will turn out with fairly even lighting, but some may have more pronounced shadows than others, giving a greater sense of roundness and depth to faces. After awhile, you'll soon recognize ideal open shade conditions as well as some favorite spots to use as your outdoor studio.
Brent Cutler photo

On a brightly overcast day in Acapulco, Mexico, photographer Brent Cutler found this young boy all smiles- especially since he didn't have to squint into the sun.

Here are some things to remember when shooting portraits in the open shade:

First, make absolutely sure your flash is set to "off" or you'll ruin the effect you're trying to achieve.

Next, if you shoot under a tree on a sunny day, avoid areas where splashes of sunlight may filter through the branches, forming a pattern on your subject's face. These may not be obvious at first because sometimes they're not very bright but they will spoil your pictures. If you can't get rid of them by moving your subject, find another tree or a different shady spot.
Nancy Protheroe photo

Photographer Nancy Protheroe shot this relaxed picture of a neighbor's child as they chatted in a shaded back yard.

Finally, heavy shade and very dark overcast days produce light so flat, your pictures will lack contrast; most highlights ­and even soft shadows­ will be lost, making faces look rather lifeless. While not fatal, it's best not to shoot under these conditions.

As you start to improve your open shade portrait techniques, you may want to get a simple backdrop that can quickly be set up behind your subject. There are commercially-made, portable ones available but you can use any backdrop you have handy­ even an old tarp. Hang it from some tree branches or just tape or tack it to a wall or fence.

Once you see the beautiful pictures you can take without keeping the sun at your back, you may begin look at open shade child portraiture in a whole new light.

All photos copyright their respective photographers.
Article copyright dpcorner.com 2001. All rights reserved.


Go to previous page Page 2 of  2


Visit Red River Paper! Digital PhotoCorner

©1998-2013 Arthur Bleich. All rights reserved.